Strong Brands ge​​​​t Angry.

Anger that is uncontained is a sign of not being present in the moment, and, therefore, being unable to manage our emotions . However, when used appropriately, anger can be harnessed to muster the courage to speak out against something we disagree with or to defend ourselves when being attacked.

I’m not espousing being angry at all times, nor lashing out at others, or hating on yourself, but if we use our intuition to recognise that a situation or person is causing us anger, then we can investigate what it is about that person/situation making us angry. If we are aware of what is making us angry, we can use that as a learning opportunity to uncover hidden feelings (guilt, grief, helplessness, disappointment, feeling trapped) or fears.

You can read more about anger and anger management from a psychological perspective on MentalHelp.net

My point is, understanding Anger or Tension helps recognise that an issue or misalignment exists, moves us to define a problem and seek a creative solution to it, and this practice applies as much to brands as to people.

What is Your Brand Angry about? 

From a communication or brand planning perspective, strong brands usually stand for something. They have a sense of purpose which creates a sense of community and common interest around the brand.

Another way I like to look at it, strong brands have identified an ‘enemy’ or something that makes them ‘angry’ and they address this with their product or service or communication campaign. For example:

Nike, ‘Just Do It,’ is against procrastination.

Ikea, ‘A better everyday life for the many people,’ is against hierarchy.

Patagonia, ‘If it’s broke, fix it! is against consumption that negatively impacts the earth.

Next time you’re thinking about your company purpose, or your next creative brief, start by thinking about answers to the following questions:

  1. What is your brand angry about?
  2. What problem does your brand find annoying that it aims to solve?
  3. Who / What is your enemy? And how can you speak out against it?

By defining your purpose this way, you ensure that your brand is of value and service to your users and community by solving existing probelms. And ultimately, this is what defines a strong brand.

Live consciously,

Brenda.

brand YOU

Set your angel free. Awesome thought.

c407e-guardian_angel_by_razvan_c-d6nbvbuThe Angel In The Stone

I edit for a living. Actually, that’s not true. I am a brand strategist. And at the beginning of every big project I amass a vast array of information, ideas and opinions.

My job, as the brand strategist, is to clear away the clutter, expose the truth that sits at the core of this array of information, ideas and opinions, and shape the words that articulate this truth in a powerful way.

The process is very much like being a sculptor, chipping away at the rock diligently and purposefully until the image reveals itself – a concept Michelangelo spoke of often:

I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.

For Michelangelo the idea was already there, inside the slab of stone, and his eyes and hands were the vessels by which the idea was brought forth. Sculpture, like editing…

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The Maker Movement.

Screen Shot 2014-03-31 at 10.19.11 AM

“Maker” is a feature-length documentary that looks into the current maker movement in America – a new wave of Do-It-Yourself and Do-It-Together fueled by passion and powered by the advent of new technologies.

The “Maker Movement”, sometimes called the “Third Industrial Revolution,” subverts traditional manufacturing by building on innovative concepts such as open source, local manufacturing, crowd funding, and digital fabrication. Breaking the hobbyist movement stereotype, “Maker” delves deep into this ecosystem of design and manufacturing in the Internet era. The film explores the ideas, tools, and personalities that are driving the Maker Movement – and returns with a timely snapshot of one of the transforming influences of the current age.

If you’re at all interested in the evolving world economy, the grassroots movement and the generation of do’ers then this is a must see.

Live well,

Brenda.

 

 

Stop Thinking, Start Feeling…

Top tips for writing great briefs – A summary of this awesome post by Rob Campbell Planning legend @Robertc1970

1) Don’t over think things.
2) Release yourself from the tyranny of conscious thought
3) Express everything in a simple yet interesting way
4) Something that allows people to ‘feel’ not ‘be told’
5) Turn functional into exciting
6) Ignore details and distractions and focus on clarity
7) Briefs that are exciting, infectious and ‘bursting with possible’
8) A proposition that opens doors rather than creates small boxes